Relationship with MISAG ALEA

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  • Relationship with MISAG ALEA

    My organisation used MISAG Decisionware, including ALEA and onVision. I note that one of the founders of your company was originally responsible for developing onVision and that Palo's concept and syntax is similar to that of ALEA and also Applix's TM1 (which inspired ALEA). Is it the intention that Palo will replicate ALEA's features and functionality or offer only a subset of this? If the latter, what would be the features Thanks.
  • RE: Relationship with MISAG ALEA

    Originally posted by AP21K
    My organisation used MISAG Decisionware, including ALEA and onVision. I note that one of the founders of your company was originally responsible for developing onVision and that Palo's concept and syntax is similar to that of ALEA and also Applix's TM1 (which inspired ALEA). Is it the intention that Palo will replicate ALEA's features and functionality or offer only a subset of this? If the latter, what would be the features Thanks.


    Typo - we still use MISAG Decisionware. The past tense in my original post is wrong.
  • RE: Relationship with MISAG ALEA

    Here are some FAQs and answers re ALEA/TM1 <-> Palo:

    --- To what extent does Palo resemble Alea and TM1?

    People who know ALEA or TM1 will be able to work with Palo right away. Palo currently offers only 80% of the features of ALEA and TM1, but it has a very simple user interface. It is our intention to open the MOLAP technology to a much wider user base by providing a simple-to-use user interface.


    --- "What features of those products does it include?"

    Palo does not support Hypercube Rules at the time being, but it does support push rules (which are less dangerous to use than hypercube rules from a performance perspective)

    Palo also does not support dimension subsets directly. Instead, Palo offers a concept of dynamically filtered dimensions (structure- and data-driven, more like the list concept in MIS OnVision).

    Palo does support dimension attributes, they are stored in a 2-dimensional cube which has the same name as the dimension to be attributed.

    Palo supports almost all OLAP worksheet functions known from other leading MOLAP solutions. There is also a Pivoting-like view generator for Microsoft Excel. Palo also supports the concept of the "Import Loop" to process import tables and execute batch rules.

    Please also have a look at the Palo Roadmap under palo.net/index.php?show=6


    --- Which features of Palo cannot be found in ALEA and TM1?

    Palo allows to modify the dimension structure online while the server is running (no need to reload the database after you modified dimensions)

    Palo allows to rename dimensions and dimension elements (without losing the attached data)

    Using the pivot view generator, Palo generates formula-based views immediately (no need to press a "convert to formulas" button)

    The Palo Server is available for Linux, Windows, AIX and other UNIX variants in 32bit and 64bit (check 213.239.204.60/browser/demo_rc2.php for a demo of a Linux based Palo server).

    Palo's code base is absolutely new, it was written entirely from scratch. So no historic burdens in the code.
  • RE: Relationship with MISAG ALEA

    Here are some of my comments:

    Originally posted by holger
    Here are some FAQs and answers re ALEA/TM1 <-> Palo:

    ...

    Palo also does not support dimension subsets directly. Instead, Palo offers a concept of dynamically filtered dimensions (structure- and data-driven, more like the list concept in MIS OnVision).


    Sounds good. I rely on dynamic subsets in TM1 quite a bit.



    Palo does support dimension attributes, they are stored in a 2-dimensional cube which has the same name as the dimension to be attributed.


    This is a good thing.



    ...

    --- Which features of Palo cannot be found in ALEA and TM1?

    Palo allows to modify the dimension structure online while the server is running (no need to reload the database after you modified dimensions)

    I don't TM1 requires reloading (or at least, it is transparent to the user).


    Palo allows to rename dimensions and dimension elements (without losing the attached data)

    This will save a lot of annoying headaches.


    ...
    Palo's code base is absolutely new, it was written entirely from scratch. So no historic burdens in the code.

    Here's a question: how does one minimize the buildup of historic burdens over time? Good design, of course, but what else? How do you plan to avoid having to re-write yet-another-MOLAP server a few years down the line? (This is not an urgent question for me; I'm just musing).
  • RE: Relationship with MISAG ALEA

    Originally posted by holger
    Here are some FAQs and answers re ALEA/TM1 <-> Palo:

    Palo's code base is absolutely new, it was written entirely from scratch. So no historic burdens in the code.


    Yep....saw the job vacancy in c't today. Hope you'll find some good guys.
    My C-times are years ago....doesn't matter.

    Good luck!

    frank
    -- xax managing data & information gmbh --